Building Surveying

Ensuring the safety, compliance, and functionality of buildings and structures.

Through provision of our building surveying services we aim to ensure that buildings and other structures are safe, compliant with relevant regulations and standards, and fit for their intended use.

We can carry out inspections and assessments of buildings and structures to identify any defects, damage, or safety hazards.

Our surveyors use specialist equipment and techniques to examine the condition of buildings, including the structure, but where matters require specialist input we utilise our trusted supply chain to inspect systems such as electrical, plumbing, and HVAC.

Our Building Surveyors provide advice and recommendations to our clients on how to address any issues identified during inspections. This may involve suggesting repairs, upgrades, or modifications to improve the safety, function, or value of a building.

Another important function of building surveyors is to ensure that buildings comply with relevant regulations and standards. This includes Building Regulations, statutory requirements and safety standards, as well as national and international standards where applicable.

In summary, building surveyors play a critical role in ensuring the safety, compliance, and functionality of buildings and structures. They provide expert advice and recommendations to clients, carry out inspections and assessments, and work to ensure that buildings meet relevant regulations and standards.

By working with Invise, clients can ensure that their investments are protected, their buildings are maintained and they remain safe and fit for purpose.

Building Surveying services we offer
Whether you are purchasing a property, looking to maximise an investment, ensure your property is maintained appropriately or just simply need some advice relating to your premises, our Building Surveyors are here to help.

Technical Due Diligence

Technical due diligence of commercial property refers to the process of conducting a thorough assessment of a property’s physical condition and operational capabilities to identify any potential risks or issues that may affect its value or suitability for a particular use.

The technical due diligence process typically involves a team of qualified professionals, including building surveyors, engineers, environmental consultants, and other experts.At Invise, we have a trusted supply chain who are utilised where required.

The team will review a range of documents and data, including building plans, maintenance records, titles and environmental reports. This allows for an assessment of not only condition, but all other matters a client should be aware of prior to purchasing a commercial property.

Our services when undertaking technical due diligence may include:

1

Structural surveys to assess the condition of the building's structure, including its foundations, walls, floors, and roof.

2

Mechanical and electrical surveys to assess the condition and operational efficiency of the property's heating, ventilation, air conditioning, plumbing, and electrical systems.

3

Environmental assessments to identify any potential hazards or contamination issues, including asbestos, mold, and other hazardous materials.

4

Fire safety assessments to assess the property's compliance with relevant fire safety regulations and standards.

5

Accessibility assessments to assess the property's compliance with disability access regulations and standards.

6

Energy efficiency assessments to assess the property's energy consumption and identify opportunities for energy savings.

7

Capital expenditure costs based upon items identified during the property inspection.

Party Wall Surveying

What is a party wall surveyor? They are a professional who is appointed to resolve disputes that may arise between two or more neighboring property owners regarding a shared wall or boundary. The party wall surveyor’s primary role is to ensure that the interests of all parties are protected and that any disputes are resolved in a fair and equitable manner.

As a party wall surveyor, our duties and services might include:

1

Conducting a thorough inspection of the shared wall or boundary to determine its condition and identify any potential issues or hazards. In addition, we can offer a Party Wall Preliminary report, which involves a survey of the site and boundaries prior to any planning application to advise on the impact of the Party Wall etc. Act.

2

Providing advice and guidance to property owners on their legal rights and obligations under the Party Wall Act.

3

Preparing and serving party wall notices to all affected property owners, outlining the proposed work and any potential impact on their property.

4

Mediating between the parties to resolve any disputes that may arise during the process, including disagreements over the proposed work, access to the shared wall, and compensation for any damage or loss.

5

Preparing and agreeing on a party wall award, which sets out the terms and conditions for the proposed work and how any disputes will be resolved.

Condition Surveys

A building condition survey is a comprehensive assessment of the overall condition of a building. It involves a methodical approach, evaluating various aspects of the building fabric, structure, and services installations to determine their current condition, identifying defects and providing recommendations for maintenance, repair or refurbishment.

The survey typically involves a thorough inspection of the building’s exterior and interior, including the roof, walls, floors, windows, doors, and structural elements. The surveyor will look for signs of wear and tear, damage, or deterioration, such as cracks, leaks, dampness, or rot.

The condition survey report will typically include a detailed description of the property’s condition, including any defects or areas of concern, along with recommendations for repairs or maintenance work to address these issues. The report may also include photographs and diagrams to help illustrate the surveyor’s findings.

Condition surveys are often carried out as part of maintenance and budget planning, particularly where a client owns a portfolio of properties. They can be very useful to help plan budgets and maintenance work over set periods, or simply to identify any potential issues before they become more serious. This allows property owners to take proactive steps to maintain or improve the condition of their property.

When undertaking condition surveys, we may include the following:

1

Exterior Assessment: Inspecting the building’s exterior, including walls, roofs, windows, doors and facades to identify signs of deterioration, moisture ingress, cracks or other defects.

2

Interior Assessment: Assessing the condition of interior spaces such as walls, ceilings, floors, stairs and partitions to identify water damage, structural instability or wear and tear.

3

Services Installations: Inspecting mechanical and electrical systems to determine their functionality, efficiency and potential need for upgrades, testing and repair.

4

Documentation and Reporting: documenting the survey findings through photographs, notes and other information. Typically presented in a format to suit each individual client’s needs but including priority ratings, condition grading and budget costs for works identified.

Schedule of Condition

A schedule of condition is a detailed record documenting the existing condition of a property or asset at a specific point in time. It serves as a reference and evidence of the condition before any changes, alterations, occupancy takes place or in connection with party wall matters. The creation of a schedule of condition provides parties involved with a document to reference as evidence when disputes arise, changes occur or when it becomes necessary to assess any potential damage or liability in relation to the property.


A schedule of condition typically includes a detailed written report and may also include photographs, videos, or diagrams to document the condition of the property. The report will typically describe the condition of the property in detail, including the condition of the walls, floors, ceilings, windows, doors, fixtures, and fittings.


The report may also include a summary of any defects or areas of concern, along with recommendations for any repairs or maintenance work required. The schedule of condition will be signed by both the landlord and the tenant, acknowledging that they agree with the contents of the report.


A schedule of condition is often required as part of a lease agreement, particularly for commercial properties, as it can help to protect the interests of both the landlord and the tenant. By documenting the condition of the property at the beginning of the lease, the parties can avoid disputes at the end of the lease regarding any damage or wear and tear that may have occurred during the tenancy.

When undertaking a schedule of condition, we typically include some of the following:

1

Written Description: A written description of the property or asset, detailing its location, boundaries and any relevant information about its use, ownership or restrictions.

2

Photographic Evidence: A series of photographs capturing the condition of various areas, both internal and external, to provide visual evidence of the existing state. These photos may focus on walls, floors, ceilings, fixtures, fittings, or any specific elements requiring attention.

3

Defects and Damage: Identification and documentation of any defects, damages, or pre-existing issues present at the time of the inspection. This may include cracks, leaks, wear and tear, or any other visible signs of deterioration.

4

Measurements and Dimensions: Recording accurate measurements and dimensions of relevant areas, rooms, or spaces within the property where necessary. This helps establish a baseline for future comparisons or assessments.

5

Services and Utilities: Documenting the condition of utility services, such as electrical installations, heating and cooling systems, mechanical installations and any other services present within the property.

6

External Areas: Assessing and recording the condition of external areas, such as gardens, car parking, driveways and access routes, or other outdoor spaces associated with the property.

7

Boundary Details: Noting the boundaries of the property and documenting any existing structures, walls, fences or other features.

Reinstatement Cost Assessment

Reinstatement cost assessments, also known as reinstatement valuations, refer to the process of determining the estimated cost of rebuilding or repairing a property to its original condition following damage or destruction. The purpose of a reinstatement cost assessment is to ensure that the property is adequately insured against potential risks. It helps property owners, insurance companies, and other stakeholders determine the appropriate level of insurance coverage required to cover the reinstatement costs in the event of a loss. By accurately assessing the reinstatement cost, property owners can avoid being underinsured or over insured, thus preventing financial losses or unnecessary premiums.

Based on this information, the surveyor will calculate an estimated cost of rebuilding the property to its current standard, including the cost of materials, labour, and any associated professional fees. The reinstatement cost assessment may also take into account any additional costs that may be incurred, such as the cost of demolishing the existing structure or complying with building regulations.

The reinstatement cost assessment is an important tool for property owners and insurers, as it helps to ensure that the property is adequately insured against the risk of damage or destruction. It is recommended that a reinstatement cost assessment is carried out periodically, especially if there are any changes to the property, such as renovations or extensions.

When providing a reinstatement cost assessment the following might be typically considered:

1

Building Structure: This covers the main structure of the property, including foundations, walls, floors and roof.

2

Internal features: This includes elements such as internal walls, partitions, doors, windows, staircases and any built-in fixtures and fittings such as kitchens.

3

Services and utilities: This involves assessing the cost of repairing or replacing essential services like plumbing, electrical installations, heating, ventilation and air conditioning and other utility connections.

4

Finishes and decoration: This evaluates the cost of restoring or replacing interior and exterior finishes, such as paintwork, flooring, tiling, and external rendering.

5

External works: This considers the reinstatement cost of external elements, including driveways, fences, gates, pathways, landscaping and any other external structures or features.

6

Specialist features: If the property includes unique or specialist features like heritage elements, listed building requirements or specialised equipment, these would be factored into the assessment.

7

Professional fees and contingencies: The assessment may also account for professional fees incurred during the rebuilding process, such as architectural and engineering services. Additionally, a contingency sum might be include to cover unexpected costs or fluctuations in material and labour prices.

Dilapidations

Dilapidations, a common concern in landlord-tenant disputes, refer to the condition of a property at the end of a tenancy. The Landlord and Tenant Act plays a key role in determining how dilapidations are handled.

We act on behalf of both landlords and tenants. As a landlord you have the right to expect the property to be returned in a good state, minus reasonable wear and tear. If the tenant hasn’t met their obligations, you can claim compensation for repairs, redecoration and reinstatement under the covenants within the lease. Our team can help you assess the dilapidations, negotiate with a tenant and their representative, and recover the costs of bringing the property back to a good standard.

As a tenant, you’re responsible for taking care of the property during your tenancy. However, you’re not liable for general wear and tear that happens through normal use. We can advise you on your obligations as outlined within your lease agreement and help you understand what constitutes fair dilapidations claims from landlords.

Dilapidations can be a complex area. By seeking professional advice early on, you can protect your interests and ensure a smoother end to your tenancy.

Whether you’re a landlord or a tenant facing dilapidations, our team can provide expert guidance. We can help you:

1

Understand your rights and responsibilities under the Landlord and Tenant Act and your lease.

2

Prepare schedules of dilapidations (landlords) and dilapidations liability assessments (tenants).

3

Negotiate dilapidations claims fairly and efficiently

4

Manage the repairs and other works required.

Looking for expert advice on construction and property matters?

Look no further! Our team of experienced professionals are here to help you with all your needs. Whether you’re a property owner, investor, developer or just looking for advice, we can provide you with the guidance and expertise you need to succeed. From construction project management to property investment, we’ve got you covered. 

Don’t wait any longer to get the help you need. Contact us today and start your journey to success!